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Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000-000 (0000) Printed 2 February 2008 (MN KTeX style file v2.2) 



A Chandra observation of the disturbed cluster core of Abell 2204 



J.S. Sanders^*, A.C. Fabian^ and G.B. Taylor^ 

' Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge. CB3 OHA 

^ National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P. O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801, USA 



2 Febmaiy 2008 



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ABSTRACT 

We present results from an observation of the luminous cluster of galaxies Abell 2204 using 
the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We show the core of the cluster has a complex morphological 
structure, made up of a high density core («« ^ 0.2 cm^^ ) with flat surface brightness, a sur- 
rounding central plateau, a tail-like feature, wrapping around to the east, and an unusual radio 
source. A temperature map and deprojected-profile shows that the temperature rises steeply 
outside these regions, until around ^^ 100 kpc where it drops, then rises again. Abundance 
maps and profiles show that there is a corresponding increase in abundance at the same ra- 
dius as where the temperature drops. In addition there are two cold fronts at radii of ~ 28 
and 54.5 kpc. The disturbed morphology indicates that the cluster core may have undergone a 
merger However, despite this disruption the mean radiative cooling time in the centre is short 
(~ 230 Myr) and the morphology is regular on large scales. 

Key words: X-rays: galaxies — galaxies: clusters: individual: Abell 2204 



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1 INTRODUCTION 

The cluster of galaxies Abell 2204 lies at a redshift of 0. 1523. It is 
luminous (Lx = 2 x 10 /j^q erg s^' in the 2-10 keV band; Edge 
et al 1990). Schuecker et al (2001) and Buote & Tsai (1996) found 
this cluster had a regular morphology based on ROSAT data. 

Peres et al (1998) identified this cluster as having the second 
most massive cooling flow within the brightest 50 galaxy clusters. 
In post-Chandra/XMM-Newton times this means it has a highly 
peaked soft X-ray surface brightness profile. Using a constant- 
pressure cooling flow spectral model Allen (2000) found a best- 
fitting cooling flow flux value of 2103^372 Mq yr^' . The central 
galaxy of Abell 2204 is one of the strongest optical line emitters 
within a redshift of 0.2, with much massive star formation (Craw- 
ford et al 1999), CO line emission (Edge 2001) and H2 line emis- 
sion (Edge et al 2002), indicating the presence a significant mass of 
cold gas near the centre. 

lenner (1974) found that the two optical nuclei of this cluster 
differ in velocity by 249 km s^ . Clowe & Schneider (2002) de- 
tected weak tensing gravitational shear around Abell 2204 at high 
significance, whilst Dahle et al (2002) observed around a dozen red 
and blue arcs and arclets surrounding the central cluster galaxy, and 
found the mass distribution to be elongated in the east-west direc- 
tion. 

Distances in this paper assume a cosmology with Hq = 
70km s^' Mpc^ and fl^ = 0.7. With this cosmology, 1 arcsec 
corresponds to a distance of 2.6 kpc. The data were processed with 
version 3.0.2 of CIAO, and the spectra were fit with version 11.3 



E-mail: jss@ast.cam.ac.uk 



of XSPEC (Amaud 1996). We used the solar abundance ratios of 
Anders & Grevesse (1989). All positions are in 12000 coordinates. 



2 DATA PREPARATION 

Abell 2204 was observed by Chandra in 2000-07-29. The data 
were reprocessed with the latest gain file appropriate for the dataset 
(acisD2000-01-29gain_ctiN0001 .f its). Time dependent gain 
correction was also applied using the CORR.TGAIN utility and the 
November 2003 versions of the correction (Vikhlinin 2003). In ad- 
dition the CIAO version of the LC.CLEAN script (Markevitch 2004) 
was used to remove periods of the dataset where the count rate was 
not quiescent. Very little time was removed, producing an event file 
with an exposure of 10. 1 ks. We used a blank sky ACIS background 
events file (acis7sD2000-01-29bkgrndN0003.f its) when fit- 
ting the spectra, reprocessed to have the same gain file as the 
dataset. We checked the count rate in the observation in a 8-10 keV 
band where there are likely to be very few source photons. It 
matched the count rate in the blank sky background file to better 
than 0.5 per cent. 



3 ANALYSIS 

Fig. Q (top) shows an image of the central region of the cluster 
using ~ 1 arcsec binning. In Fig. Q (bottom) we show an image 
with ~ 0.5 arcsec binning of the innermost core. In these and the 
other images we present, we have excluded visually identified point 
sources (Table0. 



© 0000 RAS 



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Figure 1. (Top) Image of the cluster between 0.5 and 7 keV with 0.98 arcsec 
bins. (Bottom) Image of the central region with 0.49 arcsec bins. 



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Dec 



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Table 1. Excluded point sources (J2000). 



Using a smoothed image we defined regions for spectral anal- 
ysis using a "contour binning" method (Sanders et al, in prepara- 
tion). The algorithm defines regions with a signal to noise greater 
than a threshold by "growing bins" in the direction on a smoothed 
map which has a value closest to the mean value of those pixels 
already binned. This technique defines bins which are matched to 
the surface brightness profile of the object. Additionally we applied 
constraints on the regions to have edge lengths which are 3 times 
or less than those of circles with the same area, preventing the bins 
from becoming annular. 

The smoothed map was created using an "accumulative 
smoothing" algorithm (Sanders et al, in preparation), smoothed to 
have a signal to noise ratio of at least 8. For each pixel, we find the 
signal to noise ratio. If it is less than a set threshold, we add those 
pixels of distance < 1 pixel from the starting point. We repeat, in- 
creasing in radius, until the signal to noise threshold is reached. The 
value of the smoothed pixel is the average of the pixels summed to 
reach the signal to noise threshold. 

We extracted spectra from the binned spatial regions for the 
dataset and background dataset. In addition weighted responses 
(weighted by the number of counts between 0.5 and 7 keV) and 
ancillary-responses were created for each bin. We fitted the spectra 
in XSPEC by minimising the C-statistic (Cash 1979). The spectra 
were not grouped and were fit between 0.6 and 8 keV. The model 
we fitted to each region was a MEKAL emission spectrum (Mewe, 
Gronenschild & van den Oord 1985; Liedahl, Osterheld & Gold- 
stein 1995), absorbed by an PHABS absorption model (Balucinska- 
Church & McCammon 1992). In the fit the temperature, abundance, 
normalisation, and absorption were free parameters. 

The results for the spectral analysis were combined together to 
form a map. In Fig.|2|(left) we show a temperature map produced by 
fitting spectra from regions with a signal to noise ratio of > 40 (> 
1600 counts per spectrum), and a profile of the temperatures of each 
region, plotted by radius from the centre of the cluster. Similarly, in 
Fig.|5|(right) we show an abundance map and profile. 

The centre of the cluster contains an ellipsoidal core of di- 
mensions 7x9 arcsec (19 x 24 kpc) in the east- west and north- 
south directions. This core has a very flat surface brightness profile 
(as seen in Fig. Q [bottom] and Fig. |3j. There is a point source 
offset from the centre of the core to the north-west by 2 arcsec, 
coincident in position with the edge of the southern lobe of the 
radio source (See Fig. |4}. The projected emission-weighted tem- 
perature of the core region is 3.26 ± 0.20 keV with a high abun- 
dance of 1.11 ±0.20Zg (1(7 uncertainties), found using a MEKAL 
model. From Fig. |2| (right) there are indications that there could 
be an abundance drop in the very centre. A similar effect is seen 
in other clusters (e.g. Centaurus - Sanders & Fabian 2002; Abell 
2199 - Johnstone et al 2002; Perseus - Sanders et al 2004; Schmidt, 
Fabian & Sanders 2002; Churazov et al 2003; NGC 4636 - Jones 
et al 2002). However the evidence is much less significant when we 
later examine the profile accounting for projection (Fig.0. 

Like most X-ray luminous clusters, Abell 2204 hosts a mod- 
erately bright radio source. We obtained short (122 and 30 min) 
VLA observations of TXS 1630+056 at 1.4 and 5 GHz respectively 
on 1998 April 23 with the VLA in its A-configuration. In Fig. |4| 
we show the 1.4 GHz radio image in contours overlaid on the X- 
ray image. The radio source has an unusual morphology consisting 
of three components, roughly aligned in the N-S direction over 10 
arcsec, with an extension to the west. In addition larger structures 
are hinted at in the NVSS image (Condon et al 1998). Such a dis- 
turbed radio morphology is similar to that seen in the centres of 
other dense clusters such as PKS 0745-191 (Taylor, Barton & Ge 



© 0000 RAS, MNRAS 000, 000^00 



A Chandra observation of the disturbed cluster core ofAbell 2204 3 




I6h32ni-I45 16h32m405 




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Abundance [solarj 




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Figure 2. Generated maps of the cluster using a signal to noise ratio > 40. (Upper Left) Temperature map of the cluster. (Bottom Left) Temperature profile of 
the regions in the above map. (Upper Right) Abundance map of the cluster (Bottom Right) Abundance profile. The points are at the mean radius of each bin, 
whilst the horizontal error bars indicate the range of radii occupied. The vertical error bars show the 1-C7 uncertainties. 



1994) and A2052 (Zhao et al. 1993). It is also worth noting that in 
the 5 GHz VLA observations the brightest component, with a peak 
flux density of 16 mjy, is <0.1% polarised (3 o). Such a low po- 
larised flux density is also seen in the cluster PKS 0745-191 and is 
most likely the result of very high Faraday rotation measure gradi- 
ents produced by a tangled cluster magnetic field (Taylor, Barton 
& Ge 1994). There are no apparent holes in the X-ray emission 
corresponding to the main northern radio lobe. This would be the 
case if the lobe is along the line of sight but not in the X-ray bright 
ellipsoidal core. 

In Fig.|5|we show contours from an accumulatively-smoothed 
X-ray image of the cluster on an optical image from the Hubble 
Space Telescope (HST). There are two closely separated galaxies 
at the centre of the cluster separated by a distance of 4 arcsec. 
The northern-most galaxy is associated with the brightest region 
of emission on the X-ray map in the core (although we find an off- 



set of ~ 1 arcsec if the absolute astronometry is correct), whilst the 
other galaxy to the south-west lies off the core. The northern-most 
galaxy has a fairly irregular morphology with a strong dust lane 
extending from close to the core to the south, and other possible re- 
gions of absorption lying around its core. It is unclear whether the 
two galaxies lie in close proximity in the cluster or whether they are 
only associated by line of sight. However the small velocity differ- 
ence between the galaxies (249 km s^' ; lenner 1974) suggests that 
they are closely associated. 

The core is embedded in another region with a smooth sur- 
face brightness profile and radius ~ 10 arcsec. Within this central 
plateau the core is displaced to the south. The central plateau has a 
temperature of 3.7 ± 0.2 keV and an abundance of 0.85 ± 0. 15 Zq. 

To the north-east of the central plateau there is an abrupt drop 
in surface brightness by a factor of ~ 2.5. If we extract and fit pro- 
jected spectra either side of this jump in brightness, on the inner- 



© 0000 RAS, MNRAS 000, 000-000 



4 J.S. Sanders, A.C. Fabian and G.B. Taylor 



Counts 



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Figure 3. Profile over the core of the cluster from the NE to the SW, plotting 
the number of counts in 1.96 arcsec pixels. The cold fronts are at ~ 12 (NE) 
and 26 pixels (SW). 





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Figure 4. X-ray image between 0.5 and 7 keV, smoothed with a Gaussian 
of 0.49 arcsec, overlayed with contours from a VLA 1 .4 GHz radio map of 
the central radio source. The 6 contours are spaced logarithmically between 
10"* and 0.022 Jy beam"'. The beam size is 1.78 x 1.39 arcsec in position 
angle 33 degrees. 



most side the gas has a temperature of 4. 1 ±0.6 keV and abundance 
of 0.97^g 22 Z0, but on the outside the temperature is 9.3^2 o keV, 
with abundance < 0.6 (l-cr). Therefore there is a jump in tempera- 
ture by a factor of ~ 2.3. We extracted spectra in sectors either side 
of the drop, and fitted the PROJCT model in XSPEC with an absorbed 
single temperature MEKAL component. This model accounts for 
projection by including the contribution of gas lying outside each 
shell to the spectra. We allowed the temperature, abundance and 
normalisation of each shell to be free, but tied the absorption to be 
the same in each shell. Fig. |6| (left) shows the temperature, abun- 
dance, density and pressure profiles across the drop (whose radius 
is marked with a dotted line). It can be seen that although the tem- 
perature rises dramatically and the density drops across the drop, 
the pressure remains constant. Therefore the drop is likely to be a 
cold front (Markevitch et al 2000). 

Extending from the west of the central plateau is a plume-like 
feature which wraps clockwise around that plateau, decreasing in 
surface brightness along its length, where the plume merges into 
the surrounding diffuse emission. The plume is associated with a 
region of lower temperature on the temperature map. To the west of 
the plume and core is a significant drop in surface brightness. The 
temperature beyond the drop is well fitted with a MEKAL model 



1+1 



+ 1.8 



with a temperature of lO.OIj- 4 keV, but inside is 6.6IJ- „ keV. The 
surface brightness falls by a factor of 3.6, which is greater than 
at the previous cold front. We again extracted and fitted spectra 
in sectors accounting for projection (Fig. |5| [right]). Similarly we 
found that the pressure across the drop is continuous. Therefore it 
is likely to be another cold front. 

The temperature map and profile (Fig.|2|[left]) indicate that the 
temperature rises with radius along an approximate power-law until 
a radius of --^ 100 kpc when it starts to drop back down again, before 
increasing again at around at ~ 200 kpc. This behaviour is similar 
to that shown by the abundance map and profile (Fig. |2| [right]). 
The abundance rises from ~ 0.8 Z© at the centre to ~ 1.2Z0, then 




16li32m50s 16li32ni49s 16h32m48s 16h32m47s 16li32m46s [6li32m45s 

RA 

Figure 5. HST image of the centre of the cluster with accumulatively 
smoothed X-ray contours overlaid. The HST image is taken from the 
WFPC2 Associations catalogue, http://archive.stsci.edu/hst/wfpc2/ (associ- 
ation name U5A44101B) using the F606W filter The X-ray image is an 
accumulatively smoothed image between 0.5 and 7 keV with a signal to 
noise ratio of 10, with 16 contours logarithmically spaced between 0.1 and 
24 counts per pixel. 



declining steeply with radius. Where the temperature drops down 
slightly at ~ 100 kpc, the abundance rises up, before falling away 
again. 

In Fig.0we show electron density, temperature and abundance 
profiles made by fitting the PROJCT model in XSPEC with a sin- 
gle temperature MEKAL model, accounting for projection assum- 
ing spherical symmetry. We tied the absorption to be the same in 



© 0000 RAS, MNRAS 000, 000-000 



A Chandra observation of the disturbed cluster core ofAbell 2204 5 



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Figure 6. Temperature, abundance, density and pressure profiles across the two cold-fronts. The dotted line marks the radius of the cold front. (Left) The inner 
cold front to the north-east. (Right) The outer cold front to the west. Note that the pressure is continuous across both fronts. 



each shell. The best fitting value of A'h, (3.8±0.2) x lO'^" cm"^ , is 
close to the Galactic value of 3.2 x 10^" cm^^ (Dickey & Lockman 
1990). The profiles generated from the temperature and abundance 
maps (Fig.|2j show very similar features to the deprojected plot. 
The centre of the cluster has a high electron density (~ 0.2 cm^ ), 
and flat abundance and temperature profile. We can also see the 
ring of increased abundance and reduced temperature at a radius of 
~ 100 kpc. If we introduce a power-law component in the inner- 
most annulus, there is no significant improvement in the quality of 
fit. 

From the above profiles the mean radiative cooling time 
(/cool — jkTn/L, where L is the luminosity per unit volume), en- 
tropy (5= fcr^e ) and electron pressure (P^ fcr«e) profiles can 
be calculated (Fig.|8}. The plot shows that the cooling time of the 
gas within ~ 10 kpc is short (~ 230 Myr), increasing to the age of 
the universe at around 100 kpc. If we include an extra MKCFLOW 
cooling flow model component to the innermost deprojected region 
(cooling from the temperature of the MEKAL component to zero, at 
the same abundance), a 2-CT upper limit for the cooling flow flux is 
12M0yr^' . However this value depends on the absorption used. 
If we allow the absorption to vary in each shell (note that this is not 
done in a physically-consistent way, as the absorption is not applied 
in projection), then there is a cooling flow limit of 97 M0 yr^' (2- 
ct) in the innermost shell, with a best fitting value of 40 Mr.) yr^ ' . 
Instead of the cooling flow component we also tried an additional 



powerlaw component. There was no significant reduction in the fit- 
statistic when the component was added. 

To further constrain the amount of cooling in this cluster, 
we extracted a spectrum from the inner 50 kpc, and fit it with a 
MKCFLOW model with the abundance, upper and lower tempera- 
ture free, but with the absorption fixed at the Galactic value similar 
to that used on other clusters (Peterson et al 2003). The best fit- 



fO.7 



0.5 



ting model cooled from 8.01/ 2 keV to 2.21q2 keV at a rate of 
lOgOlfi^JjMeyr"' with an abundance of 0.78 ± 0.06 Zq. If we 
introduced a further component cooling from the lower tempera- 
ture of the first component to zero, we found an upper limit for the 
rate of cooling of 15M0yr^ (2-0'). It is interesting to compare 
these values to Peres et al (1998) who measured fluxes of 842^^2 
and 843^ J52 Mq yr^' with a surface-brightness-deprojection tech- 
nique using the PSPC and HRC on ROSAT, and Allen (2000) who 
spectrally measured 2103+37g Mq yr"' with A5CA. 

These results indicate that the temperature distribution of the 
gas within the central 50 kpc is consistent with radiative cooling 
between 8 and 2 keV. Presumably some form of distributed heating 
is preventing a full cooling flow from developing. The lack of an 
accumulation of gas at a particular temperature (similar to the re- 
sult found in the Perseus cluster; Sanders et al 2004) means that the 
heating has to operate over the full temperature range. A residual 
central cooling rate of at least several Mq yr^ ' , consistent with our 
spectra, is needed to fuel the star formation rate observed (Craw- 
ford et al 1999). 



© 0000 RAS, MNRAS 000, 000-000 



6 7.5. Sanders, A.C. Fabian and G.B. Taylor 








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Figure 7. Electron density, temperature and abundance profiles in the clus- 
ter, accounting for projection. Error bars are Iff. 



Radius (kpc) 

Figure 8. Mean radiative cooling time, entropy and electron pressure pro- 
files of the cluster, derived from Fig. 171 



Where the temperature decreases in the outer part of the clus- 
ter (~ 100 kpc), it is interesting that the cooling time and entropy 
only slightly change, but the pressure decreases by a factor of 2.3. 
Furthermore this radius is where the cooling time reaches the age 
of the universe. At very large radii (> 400 kpc) the temperature of 
the cluster appears to drop dramatically to 6-7 keV. We do not un- 
derstand the cause of this apparent drop but it appears similar to 
what is seen in Abell 3581 (Johnstone et al, submitted). 



4 DISCUSSION 

There are several indications that the core of Abell 2204 is highly 
disturbed. There is the morphology of its centre: the flat core, the 
cold fronts, the central plateau, and the tail. In addition the struc- 
ture of the radio source is unusual. Other evidence is provided by 
the cool high abundance ring at around 100 kpc and, possibly, the 
binary appearance of the central galaxy. Much of this can be ex- 
plained by a merger event. Despite this disruption the cooling time 
of the centre is very short {^ 230 Myr), similar to many other 
centrally X-ray peaked clusters. Presumably this means that any 
merger was not of equal mass but with a much smaller subcluster. 
The presence of two cold fronts in Abell 2204 may indicate the 
existence of substantial magnetic fields that suppress thermal con- 
duction and prevent Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities from forming 
(Vikhlinin, Markevitch & Murray 2001). Other indirect evidence 
for cluster magnetic fields in Abell 2204 is the low fractional polar- 



isation seen at radio wavelengths. A merger has presumably left the 
central galaxy /galaxies oscillating at the centre of the cluster poten- 
tial, thereby making the inner and outer cold fronts either side of the 
central galaxy. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

ACF thanks the Royal Society for support. The authors are grateful 
to Roderick Johnstone for discussions. The National Radio Astron- 
omy Observatory is operated by Associated Universities, Inc., un- 
der cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. 



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